REDSHANK BREEDING SUCCESS

Friday 9th September 2011

Redshank (c) Tom MarshallRedshank (c) Tom Marshall

Redshanks have been recorded successfully breeding and fledging this year at Coombe Hill nature reserve, for the first time since 2007.

“[Redshank] didn’t breed from 2008 to 2010, probably because the 2007 and 2008 floods killed their invertebrate food, which took a long time to recover” says Mike Smart, Chairman of Gloucestershire Naturalists Society , “successful breeding this year suggests that the long term effects of the flooding have been overcome.”

successful breeding this year suggests that the long term effects of the flooding have been overcome

A national survey of breeding waders carried out in summer 2010, suggests that in Southwest England, Redshank continue to decline and that, due to drainage and the intensification of agriculture, they are close to becoming breeders in only nature reserves and designated sites.

Coombe Hill nature reserve was one of the Trust’s biggest restoration projects after the damage caused by the 2007 floods and is known for it’s diversity and large number of wading birds and over wintering wildfowl.

Lapwing and curlew have also been recorded successfully breeding at Coombe Hill this year, and it is a haven for a large variety of wildlife including the brown hare and otter.

Find out more about or visit Coombe Hill nature reserve