Engagement opportunities - Past projects

Past projects

Past projects

Hedgehog Way

Hedgehogs are one of the UK’s fastest declining mammal species, now classed as vulnerable to extinction, and urban areas have been shown to support particularly important populations. Over two years our Hedgehog Way project brought three urban communities together, in Gloucester and Cheltenham, to improve hedgehog habitat connectivity. The project engaged residents in neighbourhood-scale action to increase linkages for hedgehogs between gardens and green spaces, and tested the effectiveness of widely-used hedgehog holes in increasing hedgehog movement. Residents worked with their neighbours to survey and track hedgehogs and create habitat improvements and hedgehog holes to create hedgehog ways.

Our Hedgehog Way project is now complete, thank you to everyone who has been involved over the two years. Please continue to help hedgehogs in your community, but also pass on information to friends and neighbours.

The final project report can be downloaded from the link below.

Our Hedgehog Way project was kindly funded by the People's Trust for Endangered Species, and the British Hedgehog Preservation Society 

Hedgehog Way Final Report

Wild Welcome

During 2019 we used our knowledge, enthusiasm and understanding of the natural world to provide disadvantaged children and young people from Gloucestershire Action for Refugees and Asylum Seekers (GARAS) with opportunities to play, explore and improve their local green spaces and the natural world they find themselves in, in their new home in a new innovative project.

We ran after-school and after-college sessions with nature-based activities to help child refugees and asylum seekers to feel a connection to their new local environment. This worked towards our aims of connecting people with wildlife and engaging everyone, no matter their background, in taking action for nature. This helped children and young people integrate into their new community as well as help them to build a connection to wildlife and the natural world.

This wonderful project was kindly funded by St James’s Place Charitable Foundation and the Holroyd Foundation. This project completed in December 2019, however we are continuing our engagement with Refugee communities through other projects. See our Case Studies section for more details on the impact this project had on the Tazini family.

Case studies

Case studies

Love Your River

Love Your River worked to improve river habitat for wildlife across the county. Projects worked with community members and schools to improve engagement, knowledge and skills around the importance of our watercourses. Much of this work was in partnership with the Trust's Natural Solutions team. Find out more about their work here. 

The Engagement Team worked throughout 2020 to install demonstration rain gardens within the catchment. These are examples that others can follow in their own gardens and grounds. Rain gardens can help store rain water coming off roofs, and slow it's flow back into rivers reducing flooding. They also help filter and clean water before it goes back to the river and can create nice green, pollinator friendly features in gardens. More information on rain gardens can be found here. 

The aim of all of this work is to improve the biodiversity of our rivers, improve river quality and potentially help reduce flooding. 

Matson Rain Garden

Wild Kingsway

Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust's Engagement Team support communities to improve and maintain local green spaces for wildlife. We worked in Kingsway, Gloucester, during 2018 - 2020, helping local residents learn about wildlife and enhance habitat. We have been working in partnership with the Kingsway Wildlife and Sustainability Group, find out more about the group here.  This project was funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund, Gloucestershire County Council and Gloucester City Council. This project completed in 2019, however the Kingsway Wildlife and Sustainability group are still running events, volunteer days and a variety of activities to make Kingsway a better place for wildlife. 

Kingsway Bioblitz

All Paths Lead to the Hill

Since 2013 the Trust has been working, in partnership with Gloucester City Council, at Robinswood Hill Country Park in Gloucester to improve engagement by local communities with this green space. We have run eventseducation sessions and volunteer days. Although this project has now finished we continue to run activities at the site, in partnership with the council, and our head office is also based at Robinswood Hill. Activities continue to be funded by Gloucestershire Gateway Trust. We have also just launched a new engagement project at Robinswood Hill - Return to the Hill. See our Current Projects section for more details. 

Nature on Your Doorstep, Gloucester

This project brought people together in their local communities through shared activity, improving their local area, fostering pride and aid community cohesion by developing connections to each other, and by bringing nature to the doorsteps of Gloucester’s most deprived areas. We ran public awareness events, to bring the community together to learn about wildflowers and pollinators and how to increase them in their local areas through a range of options for those without gardens; We have run workshops for members of the community of all ages and abilities to work together towards shared community aims to increase access to nature through creating wildflower planter, window boxes and hanging baskets that the residents can take home to bring nature to their doorstep. We created a bee metropolis with homes for solitary bees and wildflower planting in the centre of Gloucester promoting community cohesion and helping the plight of wildflowers and their pollinators. We would like to thank the supporters of the project who included Gloucester City Council, Grow Wild and the Charles Irving Charitable Trust.

Although this project complete in 2019, and the bee sculpture / home was relocated from Kings Square in Gloucester in 2020 to make way for re-development. The bee has now found it's permanent home in the garden of St Mary DeCrypt on Southgate Street in Gloucester city centre. Staff and volunteers at St Mary DeCrypt are working hard to make the garden a wildlife haven for nature and people. The bee is a great new addition and will be a home to visiting insects. 

Bee metropolis in Gloucester City

Brighter Futures ran Wildlife and Habitat Management course's lasting six-week's in Gloucester, Cheltenham, Tewkesbury, Bourton-on-the-Water, Cirencester and the Forest of Dean. The programme was designed for long-term unemployed people and for those who feel marginalised due to learning difficulties, contact with the criminal justice system, social isolation or mental health issues.

Brighter Futures delivered significant improvements in wellbeing, transferable skills, motivation and employability while building lasting social networks between people who otherwise would not have met. Watch our short film about a recent course to see the impact that the programme can have. 

Brighter Futures was kindly funded by the Gloucestershire Police and Crime Commissioner FundMorrisons FoundationGloucester City HomesSantander Foundation, the Langdale Trust, the Winstone Charitable Trust, the D'Oyly Carte Charitable TrustThames Water Community FundGloucestershire High Sheriffs' Fund, The Rowlands Trust, the Rotary in Gloucester and the Statham Family Charitable Trust.

Brighter Futures

Brighter Futures ran Wildlife and Habitat Management course's lasting six-week's in Gloucester, Cheltenham, Tewkesbury, Bourton-on-the-Water, Cirencester and the Forest of Dean. The programme was designed for long-term unemployed people and for those who feel marginalised due to learning difficulties, contact with the criminal justice system, social isolation or mental health issues.

Brighter Futures delivered significant improvements in wellbeing, transferable skills, motivation and employability while building lasting social networks between people who otherwise would not have met. Watch our short film about a recent course to see the impact that the programme can have. 

Brighter Futures was kindly funded by the Gloucestershire Police and Crime Commissioner FundMorrisons FoundationGloucester City HomesSantander Foundation, the Langdale Trust, the Winstone Charitable Trust, the D'Oyly Carte Charitable TrustThames Water Community FundGloucestershire High Sheriffs' Fund, The Rowlands Trust, the Rotary in Gloucester and the Statham Family Charitable Trust.

Wild For Nature

Our Wild for Nature project aimed to help women with multiple and complex needs, whose disadvantage means that accessing nature is difficult. This new approach uses the restorative benefits of helping wildlife to support people create a better future for themselves and their families through creative contact with wild places. We ran a series of fully funded 6 day courses to connect people to their local countryside. The courses will improve their wellbeing and relationships and help them to access other support and courses, including volunteering opportunities with us and other local organisations.

Our Wild for Nature project was kindly funded by The Pilgrim Trust, the Langdale Trust, the W F Southall Trust and the Stock Exchange Veterans Charity Association.

Going the Extra Mile

Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust is part of the Going the Extra Mile (GEM) Project that aims to engage with and support individuals in Gloucestershire who are currently dealing with circumstances that are potentially causing barriers to work and move these people closer towards education, training, volunteering or work, including self-employment. This programme is a unique partnership of community based organisations, managed by Gloucestershire Gateway Trust on behalf of Gloucestershire County Council.

The GEM Project is jointly funded by the Big Lottery Fund and the European Social Fund.

Nature on Prescription

Nature on Prescription was a course being offered to people who have suffered a cardiac event. It was about improving fitness, supporting local wildlife, and reaping the health benefits of spending time in nature. Sessions are in beautiful places in Gloucester and the Forest of Dean and give people the chance to connect with others who’ve had a similar experience, learn about wildlife around them, and improve their fitness by walking and taking part in conservation activities.  In turn, this helps to protect habitats and support wildlife to thrive.

This project complimented the existing Cardiac Rehabilitation Programme by providing an alternative for people who prefer to be outside. It is in the pilot phase at the moment and is the first time the NHS have funded a nature-based intervention for physical health in England. It is based on a strong collaborative process with the NHS and Gloucester Local Nature Partnership. 

It was funded by Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group, and we continue our relationship with the CCG looking at other collaboration projects.

Tuffley Rose Garden

Throughout 2020 and 2021 we worked with local community volunteers on this small urban green space, on the corner of Stroud Road and Tuffley Avenue in Gloucester. The garden was planted with roses as a memorial garden, and has an accessible footpath running around the outside of it. It is a popular site for locals to exercise, and working with residents GWT has been working to make the garden a more wildlife friendly space that can be enjoyed by people and nature. 

Fruit trees have been planted, insect and bird homes installed, flower beds seeded with wildflowers and native bulbs. Also existing vegetation kept under control. Local volunteers will continue to maintain this space, with support from Gloucester City Council.

Small sites such as this can still be incredibly important for our wildlife to thrive. They can form important corridors through urban spaces, helping wildlife to move throughout our towns and cities to more wildlife rich habitats. Gloucester City is fortunate to have two nature reserves within it's boundary (Alney Island and Robinswood Hill). Sites such as the Tuffley Rose garden can help connect these nature reserves, allowing insects, and birds to safely move across the city.