Laymoor Quag is the last remaining relic of Cinderford’s wet heathland, which once covered a large area but was mostly destroyed by coal-mining and afforestation in the 18th and 19th centuries. Heathland, marsh and ponds provide habitat for a variety of flora and fauna with a variety of heathland flowers. This is a good place to look for dragonflies in the summer months.

Location

Half a mile north west of Bilson Green, Cinderford
Cinderford
A static map of Laymoor Quag

Know before you go

Size
4 hectares

Entry fee

No

Grazing animals

No

Access

.

Dogs

On a lead

When to visit

Opening times

Open at all times

Best time to visit

June to September

About the reserve

Due to coal-mining and afforestation in the 18th and 19th centuries Laymoor Quag is the last remaining relic of Cinderford’s wet heathland which once covered a large area. Heathland, marsh and ponds provide habitat for a variety of flora and fauna.  Dragonflies are abundant here, and it's as great place to watch them hunt over the wet heathland. The only known location for the petty whin, the heathland is home to heather and gorse and the bird life which call the area home. Typical heathland flowers are present and include heath bedstraw, lousewort, tormentil and sneeze-wort. Marsh marigold, cuckooflower, meadowsweet and ragged robin are nestled amongst the grass, and at the eastern edge is a spring-fed pond surrounded by the striking yellow iris, skull caps and a variety of bog mosses.   

Contact us

Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust
Contact number: 01452 383333